Latinos and Blacks: The Newest Face of Hate Crime in America

LA Daily News | The much-publicized crackdown on a Latino gang that unleashed a three-year campaign to drive blacks out of a mixed neighborhood in South Los Angeles has ripped open a dirty and very painful secret: Latinos and blacks can and do commit hate crimes against each other. And the violence can be just as deadly as the worst Southern Klan, Aryan Nation or Skinhead attacks.

Federal prosecutors in Los Angeles say Latino gang members committed or are suspected of complicity in 20 killings during its reign of terror in the area. The arrests and indictment of the gang members came barely two months after the slaying of three black students in Newark, N.J., by illegal Latino immigrants, some with alleged gang ties.

But two years before the Newark killings, Latino men were robbed, beaten and even murdered in Plainfield, N.J., Jacksonville, Fla., and Annapolis, Md. And seven members of a Latino family were murdered in Indianapolis. The attackers in all cases were young black males. The men attacked were mostly undocumented workers, and police speculate that the attackers regarded them as easy prey for robbery since they would be reluctant to report the attacks to the police.

A Los Angeles County Human Relations Commission report on hate violence in 2005 found that, overall, Latinos committed nearly half of the hate attacks in the county, while blacks committed 30 percent of the hate attacks.

Moreover, Latinos and blacks committed the bulk of the racially motivated hate attacks against each other. Nationally, blacks and Latinos commit about one in five hate crimes, and many of their victims, as in Los Angeles, are other blacks or Latinos.

This represents two more disturbing trends. One is that blacks and Latinos committed the majority of hate crimes in Los Angeles, and a sizable number of them nationally. The other is that hate crimes are increasingly being committed by blacks and Latinos against each other, and in some cases, the victims are innocent random victims.

The racially tinged violence in Los Angeles, Newark, and the other cities is not the norm – yet. The overwhelming majority of physical assaults and murders of blacks are by blacks, and most attacks on Latinos are by Latinos. However, black and Latino racial attacks against each other – no matter how infrequent, as is the case with white-on-black hate attacks – stir fear, rage and panic, while deepening racial divisions.

That’s especially true given the latent and increasingly openly expressed unease and hostility many blacks express toward illegal immigration.

There are two easy explanations for the hate violence in Los Angeles and nationally. One is that the perpetrators are bored, restless, disaffected, jobless, untutored or violence-prone gang members engaging in bloody turf battles to control the drug trade. That seemed to be the case with the Florencia 13 street gang, the target of the federal crackdown.

The other explanation is that the violence is a twisted response to racism and deprivation. The attacks no doubt are deliberately designed by the gang hate purveyors to send the message to blacks that “this is our turf, and you’re an interloper.”

There is still another reason, though more subtle and nuanced, as to why some gang members commit racial attacks. The violence is a source of ego gratification for them, and negative stereotypes provided a convenient rationale for their violent acts. University researchers have found that individuals who suffer low self-esteem or have serious self-image problems are much more likely to view others – especially those they consider rivals – through the warped lens of racial stereotypes.

Then there is the vehemence of the racial hate. The dirtier and even more painful secret is that blacks and Latinos can be as racist toward each other as some whites can be toward them.

It’s easy to see why. Many Latinos continue to demean blacks for their poverty or type them as clowns, buffoons and crooks. Some routinely repeat the same vicious anti-black epithets as racist whites. A 1998 poll by the National Conference, a nonprofit organization that promotes racial dialogue, found that Latinos were three times more likely than whites to believe that blacks were incapable of getting ahead. These myths and stereotypes bolster the notion that blacks are a racial and competitive threat, and any distancing, ostracism, avoidance and even violence toward them seems a rational response to keep blacks at arm’s length.

But stereotypes can cut two ways. Some blacks feed on the same myths and negative images of Latinos as anti-black, violence-prone gangsters who pose a menace, and who are their ethnic and economic competitors. The same 1998 poll found that as many blacks as whites believed that Latinos breed big families that they are unable to support.

The skewed misconceptions and fears both groups have about and toward each other in many instances drown out genuine efforts to lessen tensions.

The galling new fact in America is that hate can come with a black or brown face, and the victim can have the same face. That’s yet another heart-wrenching challenge for blacks and Latinos.

Earl Ofari Hutchinson’s new book, “The Latino Challenge to Black America: Towards a Conversation between African-Americans and Hispanics,” explores in depth the issue and recent incidences of black and Latino violence in Los Angeles. He blogs at www.insidesocal.com/friendlyfire.

4 Comments

Filed under african american, black man, black women, crime, culture, hate, immigration, injustice, interracial, news, race, racism, society

4 responses to “Latinos and Blacks: The Newest Face of Hate Crime in America

  1. The idea that racism is something only whites are capable of is something people really need to overcome. Everyone is capable of judging someone based on the color of their skin, which makes it all the more important to overcome such ignorance.

  2. dottie65

    I just think it’s a shame. I remember hearing…no, reading about it in an Essence Magazine about it. As much as I hear that everything in Cali is cool place to live, I keep on hearing more and more negative stuff about living out there.

  3. Violence motivated by hate happens all the time in this country, but we need to look at “hate crimes” with a wider lense before we start using the term “racism” to talk about “black-on-brown” or “brown-on-black” violence.

    How is what we see here so different from the young black men shooting other young black men? Could there have been a “racial motivation?” Yes, when we consider that people of color (including non-African descended peoples) get conditioned day-after-day to hate ourselves. This is related not only to what the media shows us, but also to the abuse that goes on within families – domestic violence, child abuse, child abandonment, etc. This is pain that is generations old, dating back to colonization, Jim Crow laws, and slavery. This is pain made worse by the ease of obtaining alcohol, cocaine, handguns and the unavailability of effective, long term therapy for most low-income people growing up in Amerika’s ghettoes.

    There is a kind of war going on within this Amerika. It is a war that most people don’t talk about, are barely even aware of. This is the war of the white elite against people of color, masked by layers of legitimacy such as “law and order (War on Drugs, Three Strikes),” red-lining in bank loan practices, tax laws promoting white flight from the inner city, “objectivism” (aka white folks not believing what people of color have to say), and the deportation of industrial jobs to Third World countries, as well as by the emergence of a more diverse middle class.

    All this is to say that we should be very careful about legitimating the way that the legal system in this country labels certain kinds of violence as “hate crimes.” Black-on-brown violence and Brown-on-black violence is a legacy of the United States’s long history of slaughter, slave-making/slave-taking, and psychological (the media) and chemical (crack, alcohol, smallpox-infested blankets) warfare. The originators of this violence are Europeans, be they English, Spanish, Dutch, French, whatever. Let’s remember that.

  4. wbme

    No, the originators of this violence is the person that commits the violence. Blaming the perpetrator away by blaming on the “white” guy does nothing to stop the problem.

    Why is blame even the point? The problem needs to be fixed and looking at the facts instead of white washing to meet you view of the world doesn’t help find a solution.

    “All this is to say that we should be very careful about legitimating the way that the legal system in this country labels certain kinds of violence as “hate crimes.” Black-on-brown violence and Brown-on-black violence is a legacy of the United States’s long history of slaughter, slave-making/slave-taking, and psychological (the media) and chemical (crack, alcohol, smallpox-infested blankets) warfare. The originators of this violence are Europeans, be they English, Spanish, Dutch, French, whatever. Let’s remember that.”

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