Category Archives: art

Surprised That I Love Fonzworth Bentley’s Fireside Chat

I’m so surprised that I really, really love Fonzworth Bentley’s Fireside Chat.  This brother has “some sense” as my grandma would say.  He is underestimated.  He is also signed to Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music.  His debut album, Cool Outrageous Lovers of Uniquely Raw Style or C.O.L.O.U.R.S. was slated to drop in 2008, but was delayed.  Wonder why they are sleeping on this Morehouse alum.

Oh the apologies that he gave out need to be given out so so so so bad.  I know all those artists were like, “Yes!  Finally!”.  Come on hip hop A&R people.  Yall got to stop giving deals to people who sound like they read and spell on a 3rd grade level.

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Church Mother remixes Beyonce “Single Ladies”

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The root of all evil: Dollar Bill Poem

Keep it real, Dollar Bill.

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How about a Historically White Kollege

Time and time again I hear white people say…

“What if there was a college fund just for whites??”

“What if there was a TV station called Caucasion Entertainment Television?” [I call that the Country music channel actually]

This cartoon did the best job of expressing just how these statements sound to me.  It really puts it into context…extreme context, yes…but context none the less. Good job Cox and Forkum.

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Black Womanhood at Dartmouth

I’m an art lover so I thought I’d share.  I’m excited about this exhibit.  Should in the vicinity of Dartmouth before August 10, you should go see this exhibit at the Hood Museum of Art.

portrait
Maud Sulter, Scottish (1960-2008)Terpsichore, 1989

Cate McQuaid/Globe Correspondent writes:

“”Black Womanhood” aches with old wounds, probed tenderly by artists who still contend with these scars and restrictions. It has a mighty scope, embracing topics such as the spice trade, Josephine Baker, African initiation rituals, and homophobia in South Africa.

The paradigm it sets up Continue reading

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Update: From the agency that created the racist homophobic Hanes ads

Here is an email we received from Philippe Krakowsky of IPG regarding our post on the racist, homophobic, horrible ads that a subsidiary branch of McCann-Erickson in India produced.

Hi Ashe –

I work at IPG, the parent company of McCann-Erickson, and was hoping to have the opportunity to share our thoughts – and concerns – with you and your readers on what happened that led to the offensive fake ads that you ran a post on a few days back.

I thought we’d posted a comment with a link to a fuller apology and explanation, but please let me take a few moments of your time to share this information with you directly.

Fake local print ads were produced by McCann Erickson India – without the knowledge, approval or consent of Hanesbrands Inc., of anyone at IPG, or of McCann’s global management. The ads are wholly inconsistent with the interest of the Hanes brand and were created only for entry into creative competitions. They would never have been approved had our internal procedures been followed and should never have been publicly distributed. We have identified the circumstances that led to this violation of our policies and of our trust, and we are taking immediate corrective action.

We have apologized to Hanesbrands for developing this objectionable work. We want to extend our apologies to those who these fake ads have offended, as well as to Hanesbrands’ customers and business partners. That is why I would appreciate it very much if you’d be willing to share this information – and the link to our full statement – with your readers.

Thank you,
Philippe Krakowsky

Ummm…fake ads? If they were created by someone at the company for a competition…that’s not fake. Some “rogue employees” created them on purpose for submission to a competition of some sort. These ads ran…that’s not fake.

From the statement…”The ads in question were developed and run locally, without the knowledge of anyone at IPG, or of McCann’s global [or country] management. The ads appeared once in a small publication in Mumbai in late 2007 so as to qualify for consideration in award competitions and were recently posted by local Indian employees at McCann onto two web sites that display international advertising campaigns.”

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Katrina Film Faces Racism at Sundance Film Festival

The Defamer is reporting that racism has reared it’s head at Sundance. This year’s award-winning (but undistributed) documentary Trouble the Water — about the odyssey of African-American survivors of Hurricane Katrina — might be off buyers’ radar because its “too black”. In the film an aspiring rap artist and her streetwise husband, armed with a video camera, show what survival is all about when they are trapped in New Orleans by deadly floodwaters, and seize a chance for a new beginning.

Eugene Hernandez (indieWIRE) relays an anecdote

“”Why aren’t more white people in the film?,” an exec apparently asked back in Park City. I’ve heard similar versions of this story from a few different people connected to the movie.”

“But, those involved with the film have hesitated to say much more about the film’s distribution prospects. After Sunday’s New Directors/New Films screening [in New York], filmmakers Tia Lessin and Carl Deal told me that they are hoping for a late summer release of their film, while another insider specified that an August opening is to be expected.”

Sources close to Water tell The Defamer that a primary sticking point for buyers is the producers’ grassroots marketing plan, which, like Wedding‘s, could take months to build in African-American communities across the country. (It’s worth noting that this is proven experience they have as former associates of Michael Moore.)

If we African-Americans can get behind Tyler Perry and some of the neo “shucking and jiving” we’ve seen on big and small screen lately, we can support this film too.

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