Category Archives: black women

Happy Birthday, Negro

I turned 33 years old yesterday and I want to thank everyone for the birthday wishes!

The funniest thing I was told yesterday was “You know that’s how old Jesus was when he died. That means something great is going to happen to you!” LOL! Leave it to Black folk to connect the death of Christ to your birthday. Well, it’s appropriate because I feel really really blessed. It was a great B-Day!

– Eb aka Sista

PS: I watched myself on Black Enterprise’s “Our World” [Black History Month edition] this morning. Thanks to Ed Gordon, my fellow panelists, and everyone who made that happen. Blessings!

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Rep. Trent Franks: African-Americans were better off under slavery

Oh Wow.  RACIST!!   I want to thank Think Progress for posting this.  This is some straight BS!  If you are a black person living in AZ you need to campaign really, really hard to get this man out of office.  Here’s the info:

Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) — one of the most conservative member of Congress, according to a new National Journal ranking — decried the strained state of political discourse in an interview today with blogger-activist Mike Stark. While defending hate radio host Rush Limbaugh, Franks said bipartisanship and “true tolerance” is about “being halfway decent to each other in spite of the differences.” But when the conversation turned to abortion, Franks made a clearly indecent comment, claiming that African-Americans were probably better off under slavery than they are today:

FRANK: In this country, we had slavery for God knows how long. And now we look back on it and we say “How brave were they? What was the matter with them? You know, I can’t believe, you know, four million slaves. This is incredible.” And we’re right, we’re right. We should look back on that with criticism. It is a crushing mark on America’s soul. And yet today, half of all black children are aborted. Half of all black children are aborted. Far more of the African-American community is being devastated by the policies of today than were being devastated by policies of slavery. And I think, What does it take to get us to wake up?

What?  Huh?  Don’t believe me?  Watch it (beginning 6:20):

Franks continued by saying, “[S]ometimes we get angry and say things that we shouldn’t say, and I apologize…[for saying things] that are intemperate. But I don’t want to hide from the truth.”

Truth? Readers, is this the truth? AZ, is this the truth that you want your Representatives to believe in?

Update: Salon.com has picked up the story.  They report this: Abortion-rights opponents like to compare abortion and slavery; the Dred Scott vs. Sandford case is often seen on the right as the 19th century equivalent of Roe v. Wade. Still, the comments caught the attention of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

“To compare the horrors and inhumane treatment of millions of African Americans during slavery as a better way of life for African Americans today is beyond repulsive,” said Stephanie Young, a DCCC spokeswoman. “In 2010, during the 2nd year of our first African American president, it is astonishing that a thought such as this would come to mind, let alone be shared. The next time Congressman Franks wants to make assumptions about what policies are ‘best’ for the African American community, he should keep them to himself.” [Full Article]

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Question: Who is this “We” people always refer to when talking about change in the Black community?

I’m looking for WE.  You know, the “WE” that Black journalists, commentators, business people, politicians, and pundits talk about when they are interviewed on television and radio.  When they say things like…

  • We need to educate our children and take back our communities.
  • We need to harness our socioeconomic power and influence corporations.
  • We need to support “X” and “Y” legislation.
  • We need to step up and be fathers, mothers, mentors, leaders, business people, etc.

Do you know who “We” is?

In my opinion, the homogeneous black WE is a figment of the imagination.  We as African-Americans are not of one economic or social strata.  We are not all college educated or high school drop outs.  We don’t all have the Cosby family dream or come from strong single mother households.  It is this reality that is overlooked when people call on the WE.

When you call out to someone who isn’t there…they don’t hear you.  Black America is not hearing the call of some of it’s best and brightest leaders because they aren’t calling US collectively.  We are not WE…we are YOU.  You are the poor sista on welfare who is looked down upon because she needs food stamps to survive.  You are the brother who was passed along by “No child left behind” so that the graduation rates would be acceptable.  You are the child who is told they can be a great as Martin Luther King, but faces a reality in their neighborhood that says they will be lucky to secure a decent paying job after high school graduation.

When we all see our brothers and sisters as ourselves we gain the perspective that compassion and understanding brings.  Advising from a place of understanding brings context, and context makes words relevant.  You must take on the challenges, differences, issues and problems and see them on a personal level.  Seek to understand, not just provide lip service.  Then we can go from You to US.  Community.  You are then able to speak to the community at large as well as segments of the community in the ways that are most effective.  From there we can move the community to action, because as we all know, actions speak louder than words.

I don’t think that many people I hear are talking about US when they say “We need to”.  I think they are really saying that “The Talented Tenth” needs to.  They may be saying “You people” need to.  I think the appeals and advice, no matter how good and well intentioned, is falling on deaf ears.  We need action plans and road maps to the future that are formulated to appeal to our diverse community.  Black History Month is a great time to consider whether it’s time for talking or time for us to build community and effect change.

Hello, Negro family, I’d love to know your thoughts on this.

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Sunflower: The hoof polishing black centuar from Disney’s “Fantasia”

Cracked Magazine put together a list of Disney’s 9 most racist characters.

  1. Boy Thursday (1948)
  2. Uncle Remus in “Song of the South” (1946)
  3. The Indians in “Peter Pan” (1953)
  4. Sunflower the Centaur in “Fantasia” (1940)
  5. The Siamese Twin Gang in “Chip ‘n Dale Rescue Rangers” (1989)
  6. King Louie in “Jungle Books” (1967)
  7. The crows in “Dumbo” (1941)
  8. Sebastian in “Little Mermaid” (1989)
  9. The Merchant in “Aladdin” (1991)

Oh Lordy, I remember dem Crows.  Who doesn’t remember those doggone crows.  Sigh.  However the standout for me is the little known Sunflower the Centaur.  Many are not aware of this character who was banned (removed) from the 1960 re-release of the film.

Cracked tried to link to the video below showing a clip from Fantasia.  It’s sense been removed.  You know Disney isn’t having that.  Never fear, I found a clip on YouTube that includes Sunflower (about 1 min in).  It’s crazy to see all these lovely white centaurs and all of a sudden…Bam… a shoe shining “jigga boo” black centaur.  SMH  It’s even sadder to me when the male centaurs come on the scene and all the white female centaurs are having their heads adorned for their dates, around 2:17 you see Sunflower again, with a sunflower in her hair, putting flowers all over someone else’s tail.  The portrayals of black beauty that our foremothers had to deal with…shame.  View it now before they take this one down, too.

I love what Cracked had to say about this character:
Lesson Learned:
Even in Fantasia‘s beautiful, magical landscape, African centaurs are hoof-polishing handmaidens for prettier, Aryan centaurs. Also, 1940 was a great year to be a centaur fetishist and/or Don Imus.

Best (Worst?) Moment:
It was insulting enough for Disney to include the smiling servant stereotype to begin with, but, to make matters worse, they started categorically denying Sunflower’s existence with the Fantasia re-release in 1960. How does that possibly make things better? “No, you misunderstand. In our perfect, Fantasia world, Africans aren’t servants. They don’t fucking exist.”

Ouch.  I’m sure a black person wrote that last line. 🙂  I actually wish more films were released on DVD with their racist content as a special feature.  When this stuff is removed the public doesn’t have a chance to witness the kind of blatant racism that was so common in the media 60 plus years ago.

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Black Olympic First: Ice skating duo to make history

During this year’s winter Olympics, French ice skating duo Yannick Bonheur and Vanessa James will be the first Black duo to compete in the event.

From AFP – “It’s destiny and I’m very happy about it,” said 27-year-old Bonheur.

“There’s the grace and beauty of Vanessa and then my athleticism. And the fact that we’re both black brings a pleasing visual harmony.”

James previously competed internationally for Britain as a single’s skater. She was the 2006 British national champion and 2007 silver medallist.

The pair moved to Indianapolis in the United States in August 2009 to train with Russian coach Sergei Zaitsev.

And last December they booked their ticket to Vancouver by winning the French nationals, a victory which enabled James to receive French citizenship.

Bonheur said they were determined that their Olympic experience will lay the groundwork for future successes, after they finished seventh at Europeans.

“This is just the beginning. We want to make a name for ourselves so that they’ll remember us for next season,” he said.

Being tagged the first black pairs skaters is not a disadvantage, they insist.

“It’s often been remarked that we look different on the ice. So we want to highlight that,” said Bonheur.

I remember watching Surya Bonaly doing that one foot backflip.  I don’t think she ever got a medal, and I also recall a great deal of controversy and jokes at her expense.  That was the 90s.  I’m not sure the sport has grown that much, however I’m encouraged by these talented athletes.

Perhaps more diversity in the ice skating world will prevent incidents like this.

Really?  Brown body suits, faux body paint and eucalyptus leaves = Aboriginal. Sad.  Racial and cultural insensitivity.

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Real Housewives of Atlanta nominated for NAACP Image Award

The blogs are a buzzing this week with news that Bravo’s “Real Housewives of Atlanta” has been nominated for an NAACP Image award.   I agree with Bossip, someone should be fired.  I didn’t believe it a first.  I had to check the facts for myself on the NAACP website.  There it was:

Outstanding Reality Series

  • “American Idol 8” (FOX)
  • “America’s Next Top Model” (CW)
  • “Dancing With the Stars” (ABC)
  • “Extreme Makeover” (ABC)
  • “Real Housewives of Atlanta” (Bravo)

Someone please tell me this is a hoax.  Next they will be giving Kisha Cole’s momma an Image Award.  Hell, I know Mr. Brown is bound to get nominated in the “Step n’ Fetch it” category.  This tops their nomination of R. Kelly…

…well, maybe not.  Where am I?  Someone please tell me this is just a dream.

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You Can Check “Negro” on This Year’s Census. Yippee!

NPR is reporting that the US Census has slipped up and put “Negro” on the 2010 form.  You guys know that I have a special place in my heart for this word (see the title of this blog).  They claim they added it because some older African-Americans wrote it on the form in previous years.  Really?  I need to call Mother Dear and tell her not to do that.  It’s 2010.  I wonder if they actually considered adding in “colored” as well.

Census Bureau, do you really have to think about these things?  Really!?!?  DC is a few min away from their Suitland MD offices.  I might need to send a letter or something.

I’m not surprised.  I think someone may have been lashing out in a form of anti-Obama style protest.  It reminds me of when that artist put a penis in the art work of the Little Mermaid VHS cover.  Here’s the sccop from NPR.Org

http://2010.census.gov/2010census/how/interactive-form.php

Photo: From the 2010 questionaire. (Census.gov)

By Mark Memmott, NPR.org

The Census Bureau says it has included “Negro” as a way for individuals to classify their race in the 2010 Census because some older African-Americans wrote it on their forms in 2000.

But many African-Americans find it insulting.

— “It’s almost like a slap in the face,” Nikyle Fitzgerald tells WTOL in Toledo.

— “I am a little offended,” Dawud Ingram says to WCBS-TV.

— “It’s a bad vibe word,” Kevin Bishop says in the New York Daily News.

We’ve asked Census for some historical background on when the word has been used in the past. We’ll update with that information.

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