Category Archives: culture

Freaknik the Musical: May Have Set Blacks Back a Step or Two

I can sum it up in 2 words: Neo-Coonery Foolishness.

I want the 30 min or so that I watched “Freaknik the Musical” back.  I think my credit score is actually lower this morning because I watched that mess.  That was one of the most ignorant, trifling, things I’ve ever seen.  There was no redeeming value.  Period.

  • A fat guy jumped into a sea of jiggling asses
  • Lil Wayne voiced a drug dealing king pin/Jesus Christ character
  • The Boule’s Oprah-looking charater
  • The robot that looked like Al Sharpton, voiced by Charlie Murphy

Now, I don’t know why I would have expected any less from T-Pain.  But you know what, he’s just a pawn.  I’m sure he was not the head person in charge.  I don’t know how a group of people…likely blacks and whites…got together and decided to spend money to produce this craziness.  I have to shout out “Come’on Son!!” to Cartoon Network on this one.

Now, let me just say to the haters…I know the Boondocks is on the same channel and last night a number of people noted on Twitter (hashtag: #freaknik) that they felt it was hypocritical that people love that show but hated this coon fest.  The difference: Boondocks episodes has a point.  There is an insight or awareness that is weaved through those episodes that is mixed in with various levels of craziness.   At the end of “Freaknik the Musical” what was the point?  Somebody please tell me!  Um…”Trap Jesus” aka Lil Wayne was in jail and “Ghost of Freaknik Past” aka T-Pain ran away from a woman who had just told him that she needed support for his baby.  WTF?

I will say that it had some potential.  They tried to comment on the struggle between old guard, black bourgeois and leadership vs.  the youth of the hip hop generation.  Also, some needed attention was given to illiteracy.  One of the main character’s catchphase was “It’s in a Book”.   That charater’s name was…”Light Skin”.

Wow.  Skin color divisions, rampant images of over sexualized women, violence, drug use, drug sales, etc… and that’s just the cartoon version.  No wonder Freaknik is no more.

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Filed under african american, black, black men, booty, community, culture, ghetto, hip hop, opinion, stereotype

Happy “I’ze Married Now!” Day to All My Black DC Gays and Lesbians

I’m straight, but i’m no hater.  I want to give a congratulations shout out to all of the gay and lesbian folks in Washington, DC who can now get married.  The Washington Post reports that couples lined up beginning at 6 a.m. at the D.C. district courthouse, vying to be among the first same-sex couples to apply for marriage licenses.  Good for them. Whether it’s mixed race couples, couples from different sides of the tracks, or people who get married and everyone knows they shouldn’t…we all deserve to choose who we walk down the isle with.

When we start picking and chosing who gets what rights and who deserves what freedoms, we get onto a slippery slope.  There was a time when African Americans were not free to live where they wanted to live, marry who they loved, or just go have a burger at the local diner just because of the social norms and stereotypes that helped shape American law.  Discrimination was  the law.  Treating one group as lesser than another was the law.  I’m so glad to say that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation when it comes to marriage is no longer the law here in the District.

PS: You better make sure that marriage comes with same-sex divorce too.  I’m just saying.  LOL

Photo: Michael K. Cole & Jamil Smith Cole. The two jumped over the broom Atlanta Georgia in 2009.

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Filed under african american, black, civil rights, community, culture, d.c., gay, government, news, opinion, relationships, society, washington, washington dc

Noose Found on UC San Diego Campus as Racial Tentions Continue

You know it’s a racial incident when a noose is found.  A noose.  That lasting symbol of white supremacy.   When someone puts a noose up…”them’s fighting words”.

According to Huffington Post, last night, a noose was found hanging on a light in the campus library, according to the UC Regents (Live)blog. A female student admitted to placing the noose there today. This incident comes after the “Compton Cookout” Black History Month drama that we’ve been following here on Hello, Negro.  Photo of the noose comes from http://ucregentlive.wordpress.com

“This is truly a dark day in the history of this university,” Chancellor Marye Anne Fox told students gathered along Library Walk. “It’s abhorrent and untenable.”

I say, America, hate is on your doorstep.  You need to let it in and have a conversation about what is and is  not to be tolerated in YOUR house.  To the students at UC San Diego, I suggest that you band together.  Black, White, Hispanic, Asian, Middle Eastern…an injustice to one is an injustice to all and the eyes of the nation are upon you.  Sometimes the young have to be the example of and change and evolution of thought for the old, for the establishment.

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Filed under african american, black, black history, crime, culture, hate, news, opinion, race, racism, student, white folks, youth

Surprised That I Love Fonzworth Bentley’s Fireside Chat

I’m so surprised that I really, really love Fonzworth Bentley’s Fireside Chat.  This brother has “some sense” as my grandma would say.  He is underestimated.  He is also signed to Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music.  His debut album, Cool Outrageous Lovers of Uniquely Raw Style or C.O.L.O.U.R.S. was slated to drop in 2008, but was delayed.  Wonder why they are sleeping on this Morehouse alum.

Oh the apologies that he gave out need to be given out so so so so bad.  I know all those artists were like, “Yes!  Finally!”.  Come on hip hop A&R people.  Yall got to stop giving deals to people who sound like they read and spell on a 3rd grade level.

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Filed under african american, art, black, black man, culture, hip hop, hollywood, music, video, youtube

Why I Don’t Like Today’s Article in the Washington Post Express on Mike Epps

I read the Washington Post Express a lot in the mornings.  It’s got just the right mix of pithy entertainment and actual journalism.  Well, today I was in for a real Post-Racial treat.

I don’t know who you are, Roxana Hadadi, but I’ve got to tell you that I think your article to day on Mike Epps was terrible and had some serious problems.  Here’s what I didn’t like:

  • You mention a story where 2 movie reviewers at a screening for “Resident Evil: Extinction” think that Omar Epps is the movie instead of Mike.  That played into the “All black people look alike” myth.  You note that they are cousins.  That’s no excuse.  They look Nothing alike.  Nothing.  Omar doesn’t even do comedy.You even say, “…Epps is inevitably the guy you immediately laugh at– even though you may first mistake him for his more dramatic relative”.  Huh?  I’m sorry, no one is mixing those two brothers up.
  • The title of this article “Familiar Stranger” made me think of “stranger danger”.  So is this black man scary, like a stranger?
  • You say that he takes stereotypes about the “funny brother” and “drop-kicks them back in your face, making them absurdly believable wile also hysterically humorous”.  Basically your saying that he does the stereotype so well that it’s hysterical.  How can you flip something but then end up being the embodiment of it?
  • You move on to Epps’s role in “The Hangover”: “Oh, and those comments on roofies — “Just the other day, me and my boy was wondering why they even call them roofies. … Why not floories, right? Cuz when you take them, you’re more likely to end up on the floor than the roof” – may be horribly inappropriate, but they’re also guiltily funny. They’re not as divisive or controversial as the kind of stuff fellow comedians-turned-actors Chris Rock and Dave Chappelle have said, but in a way, Epps — who performs Saturday at DAR Constitution Hall — has a goofy, universal appeal that rivals Rock’s and Chappelle’s natural charisma.”

    First of all, are you saying that it’s not controversial to make fun of roofies?  It’s the damn date rape drug!  Then you call two very intellectual Black comedians “divisive”.  I really, really would love to hear your explanation for the use of that word.  What do you find divisive about Rock and Chappelle.  Perhaps their jokes about race and race relations?  Divisive is a whole lot of things in this “Post-Racial” world, huh?  Question: Would you call Richard Pryor divisive as well?  You say Epps has a universal appeal, but I think Rock and Chappelle are even more universal in their appeal.  Of course all of this is just my opinion.  Roxanna, you are entitled to yours as well, I just think you’re off.Also you mention Epps’s joke about getting money from white friends and never having to pay it back.  Isn’t that a divisive joke?

I dont’ understand where you were going with this article, Roxana. It seems a bit, well…divisive.

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Filed under african american, black, black man, culture, d.c., funny, hollywood, opinion, race, stereotype, washington, washington dc

“I’m NOT A Tragic Mullato” shirts: Just in time for Blk History Month

Black History Month is coming to an end.  Only 5 more shopping days to express your excessive negro pride.

In honor of our Mulatto president, who is SO not tragic, I think you should go on over to the Hello Negro Shop…Today…and purchase one of our “I’m not a Tragic Mullato” shirts for your favorite mixed race friend or loved one. I created this shirt for my niece who is 1/2 black, 1/4 white, & 1/4 hispanic.  Just in case you don’t know what “The Tragic Mullato” here’s some background information.

You can also pick up a great Hello Negro tee as well.  We’ll be posting some new designs really soon.  Got any ideas?

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Filed under african american, black, culture, fashion, funny, hello negro, negro

The Simpsons Celebrate Black History Month and Their Racially Mixed Heritage

I’m sitting here watching the Black History Month Episode of “The Simpsons”.  The title “The Color Yellow”.  Um…really?  Must they co-op the title of one of the most beloved pieces of fiction in the black community?

When Miss Hoover asks her students to research their family history, Lisa is horrified to discover that most of her ancestors were bad people – a motley crew of horse thieves and deadbeats. But while rummaging through the attic, Lisa happens upon a diary kept by her ancestor, Eliza Simpson. As Eliza’s story unfolds, Lisa learns that her family was part of the Underground Railroad, a group that helped slaves escape to freedom. Eliza recounts liberating a slave named Virgil (guest voice Brown), but when Lisa presents her findings at school, some of her classmates refute it, leaving Lisa determined to exonerate her family’s name.

Wow, one of Mr. Burns ancestors just checked over one of Homer Simpson’s ancestors like a slave on the auction block.  He noted that if anyone knows how to estimate the value of a man, he does. I don’t know what to say, but I think I like this episode. Wouldn’t you just know it, Antebellum Marge was an abolitionist who fell in love with a brother and ran off to Canada! Oh as a descendant of their union, Lisa is 1/64th black.  She says, “That’s why my Jazz is so smooth!”. Homer says “That’s why I make less than my white co-workers!”.  Wow. Good episode, but I like “Nate, Peter’s black ancestor” on Family Guy better.

I guess I get the title now.  Are they saying that the Simpsons are yellow in the way black folks commonly use the word…yella gal or high yellow?  Interesting.

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Filed under african american, black, black history, black man, culture, history, race, slavery, television