Tag Archives: black women

What do you think about Chris Rock’s “Good Hair”?

Hi all,

I was so proud to strut out of the theatre rocking my long, natural locs after seeing Chris Rock’s “Good Hair”.  No perm over here, homey!

I’ve seen some reviews from sistas on blogs and all over the net… all largely positive.  I was enlightened by the information on how the chemicals in relaxer really work (that chicken example cured me from ever wanting the “creamy crack on my head AGAIN!!!) and the info on where weave really comes from.  It made me wonder if some of the women I know (who are very picky and won’t even eat the potato salad at a picnic if they don’t know who made it) will be weary of wearing hair that might have had “bugs” in it.

Things I loved about it:

  • Derek J – A tiny man in tall heels
  • The scene where the white guy gets botox.  Hilarious!
  • The reactions to Chris selling black hair – I wonder if someone is going to have some angry customers at their weave shop after that??
  • The fact that they didn’t show the hair being washed and chemical treated in India – Um…did they wash and treat it?  I mean he showed Dudley Product’s whole set up…just wondering.
  • Black men talking about how they can’t touch their woman’s hair.
  • Exposing how bad relaxer really is for the skin and hair.
  • Raven Simone – That is a REAL chick, right there!  Someone who you could just hang out with.  I love her!
  • Nia Long needs her own TV show.  She is so funny and real.  Loved her comments.
  • It’s a shame how early some little girls are taught that their hair is “bad”.
  • Where are women getting thousands of dollars to spend on weave?!?!  I never knew it cost so much for good quality “fake” natural hair.

Like many of the reviewers who’ve commented on the movie, I thought there was a lot of information missing regarding the source of self hatred when it comes to beauty in the black community and assimilation to euro standards (Sharpton did break it down, though.  Nicely!).   However, the movie is a winner without that information.  Rock is a commedian, not an activist.  I loved the movie and encourage others to see it.

Did you see the movie?  What are your thoughts on “Good Hair”?

Update: One of my black young female co-workers and a white older female co-worker were talking about the movie a few mins ago.  The younger one said “My boyfriend told me yesterday, “You’re wearing those people’s oppression on your head!”, referring to her weave.  Toooo Funny!  Although, he does kinda have a point.

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Real Housewives of Atlanta: The reunion was GHETTO as hell

I’m sorry…I really, really didn’t want to speak on the Real Housewives of Atlanta at all. Sure, like a lot of folks out there I watched the show as a guilty little pleasure. You have to admit, it is entertaining television.

I watched the reunion show last night and I must say…they were in rare form. Rare! Oh my goodness. I really thought someone’s weave or wig was going to fly across the screen. Here are my thoughts:

  • Ne Ne saying that the rumors of her bring an ex-stripper are false because she currently strips, but only strips for her husband was one of the best lines of the night.
  • Lisa should have let Ne Ne loose. I would have been ok with her getting one good slap in on Kim. lol
  • Kim, why would you elude to the fact that you are wearing a wig because you have cancer and then take it back in the next few sentences. You sound crazy? I was sitting there thinking…ok…do you have some other terrible disease? Sexually transmitted maybe (I only say that because that was my reaction to the fact she said she didn’t want to talk about it. If you’ll mention cancer but not another disease…what do you have to hide?) Oh, and let me not forget to mention that Dallas Austin has publicly said that he and Kim are not working together and that he was just working with her for TV on his Myspace blog.
  • I love Dwight!!! He is fierce! Note to Bravo: He needs his own show!
  • What was up with the hole in Sheree’s sweater? Did a fight breakout before the taping?
  • Was it just me or was DeShawn a little less perky now she’s gone through the after-show drama and commenting/gossip (online and otherwise) that has surely taken her through the ringer for her extravagance, her servants, and the failed fundraiser?
  • Lisa??? You were the good one, right? What in the world did Kim do to push her buttons. She looked like she was about to take her earrings off and whop Kim’s a**.

Like Flavor Flav’s reality show dating journey, I knew this show was going to be a general train wreck Continue reading

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Single Black Men: Is marriage really for white people?

Watch this video and here what Brothers have to say about the matter (from CNN’s Special Reports area of the “Black in America” site.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/wayoflife/07/22/single.black.women/
index.html#cnnSTCVideo

FYI: They also posted this great article on one sista’s singleness http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/wayoflife/07/22/single.black.women/
index.html

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Study Looks at Risks Associated With Oral Contraceptives for Black Women

Black women taking low-dose oral contraceptives have a risk of side effects that can lead to heart disease and diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology, Reuters Health reports.

For the study, NIH researcher Anne Summer and colleagues examined 104 healthy black women who did not have diabetes. Twenty-one of the women were taking oral contraceptives and 83 were not.

Researchers found that compared with the other participants, the women taking oral contraceptives had higher glucose levels after fasting for two hours and higher fasting triglyceride levels. They also were more insulin-resistant. In an analysis based on weight, researchers found that women taking oral contraceptives who were not considered obese were more insulin resistant and were more likely to be glucose intolerant.

According to the study, “Compared with white women, African-American women are more insulin resistant, have a higher prevalence of glucose intolerance and paradoxically lower triglyceride levels. Therefore, the metabolic effects of oral contraceptive pill observed in white women cannot be extrapolated to African-American women.” [full article]

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Black Womanhood at Dartmouth

I’m an art lover so I thought I’d share.  I’m excited about this exhibit.  Should in the vicinity of Dartmouth before August 10, you should go see this exhibit at the Hood Museum of Art.

portrait
Maud Sulter, Scottish (1960-2008)Terpsichore, 1989

Cate McQuaid/Globe Correspondent writes:

“”Black Womanhood” aches with old wounds, probed tenderly by artists who still contend with these scars and restrictions. It has a mighty scope, embracing topics such as the spice trade, Josephine Baker, African initiation rituals, and homophobia in South Africa.

The paradigm it sets up Continue reading

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The Wedding Proprosal, hope and single black women

The Wedding Proposal is a personal documentary where the filmmaker takes stock of her life style and romantic choices during the year of her 35th birthday. The film examines the institution of marriage, opinions and attitudes about marriage and marriage options from the viewpoint of professional African-American women my age and older.”

Thomas Lopez-Pierre (holding private placement memorandum) with models during casting call for Fashion Show Club Magazine /investor presentation for Lopez-Pierre Realty, LLC, November 19, 2007 (NYC)
Thomas Lopez-Pierre (holding private placement memorandum) with models during casting call for Fashion Show Club Magazine /investor presentation for Lopez-Pierre Realty, LLC, November 19, 2007 (NYC)

I’m watching Anjanette Levert’s documentary on BET right now. The filmmaker, an educated African-American journalist, celebrates her 35th birthday and acknowledges to her dismay that she is STILL unmarried. For answers she turns to her family, her friends and a very interesting negro…Thomas Lopez Pierre, Managing Partner of The Harlem Club, a private social club for professional African-Americans. Any professional man is eligible to join, but women must be under 35, single, have no children; AND they must also submit head and body photos. Thomas points out the troubling statistic that of those African-Americans that graduate college, 65% are women. That leaves a shortage of available professional men for women like Anjanette. As you might think, the ladies in the documentary are not feeling Mr. Lopez. He says that most professional men don’t want a partner (who is a professional woman who works and that they have to support in their goals and journey to success) …they want a wife and that they want to walk into the room with a drop dead gorgeous woman/trophy that personifies their success. He also says there is NO hope for any unmarried black woman over the age of 35. Very interesting…sigh.

What do I think?
Everybody wants love. No body wants to be one of “those women”.  Yall know what I’m talking about!

Very interesting so far…it will be on again as part of the Black Stories series, I’m sure.

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Black Women and the Fear of Natural, Nappy Hair

Wigs, weaves, extensions and chemical relaxers are examples of how hair is socially, psychologically, and culturally significant to the black female experience
By The Star.com
As a black woman living in Canada, I often feel invisible when it comes to my natural hair. The television series da Kink In My Hair (which just wrapped up its first season on Global television) taps into a lot of the issues black women have with hair, but on the streets of Toronto, it’s a whole other story.

Some people might be offended by what I have to say, and others might think: “It’s just hair. Get a life.” Fair enough. But, since freeing myself from the dependency of chemically relaxing my hair every eight weeks, I feel it important to use my voice.

Too many black women can’t remember what it’s like to feel their natural hair. I know several, who have not felt their scalp since Bobby Brown was a member of New Edition. And I have sat in hair salons with women who spend more money on their hair than their education.

I also know a lot of black women who secretly want to go natural, but fear the reaction at work, what their family will say, even that their partner will leave them. If hair is just hair, you’d think going natural would be just as easy as processing your hair.

Then there are weaves, a process by which synthetic or real hair is sewn into one’s natural hair to give the appearance of long, flowing, straight hair. While many women, irrespective of race, wear weaves (they’re common in Hollywood), black women wear them to cover up, not merely enhance, their natural state.

Talk about hair is so woven into the black female experience that people often make jokes about who has “good hair” and who has “bad hair.” In the song “I Am Not My Hair,” India Aries sings, “Good hair means curls and waves/Bad hair means you look like a slave.” A lot of people might not have a clue as to what she’s talking about, but, as a black woman, I sure do. Continue reading

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