Tag Archives: friday question

Friday Question: What should be done about black youth and education?

Black youth are not getting a quality education in many of the major centers of black life in this country (NYC, ATL, DC, Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Chicago, etc.) Not to mention all across the south. Nationally, the graduation rate is 53 percent; in contrast, the graduation rate of what schools call “underrepresented minorities” – blacks, Latinos and American Indians – is 45 percent. In California alone, 41.3 percent African-American students drop out of high school.

If these children are not prepared to graduate from high school and don’t attend college or get some form of higher education…what will be their prospects for the future? Will they end up with low paying jobs, find crime as a way to support themselves, or just fade into the new face of U.S. poverty. A recent study on the bulging prison system noted, “One in 100 Americans is behind bars in 2008, about 2.4 million people currently are incarcerated and nearly 60 percent of young black males who dropped out of high school have served time in jail

What will happen to the young people who do not receive a REAL “education” from America’s public school system?

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Friday Question: Do you remember this Afro-Am clip from Sesame Street

A loaf of bread, a container of milk and a stick of butter.  OH my goodness.  I almost teared up when I saw this on YouTube.  As a child this was one of a few animations on Sesame Street that had black characters.  This was my FAVORITE!!!  I was that lil black girl going to the corner store for Mom, jamming to my own rhythm.  Sigh…I’m such a sap sometimes.

“From 1972, the classic animated segment about memory, which has done a pretty good job of sticking in the memories of a generation of Sesame Street viewers. Produced by Jim Simon’s Wantu Studios.”

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Friday Question: Is Obama Addressing Black America’s Issues?

This article brings up a good question for our discussion this friday.

HAS OBAMA ADDRESSED BLACK ISSUES? by CASH MICHAELS
The Wilmington Journal

Beyond the need for the black family to be strengthened, and errant black fathers in struggling inner cities to help rear their children, has Sen. Barack Obama addressed other serious policy issues specific to the African-American community, or has he, as Rev. Jesse Jackson has suggested, engaged only in “talking down to blacks”?

The answer can be found on YouTube (www.youtube.com), the popular Internet video site, where a four-part, “Obama w/Black Press” video of the Democratic presumptive presidential nominee speaking to publishers and reporters with the NC Black Publishers Association (NCBPA) three months ago can be found (go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1NA4T0F-rU to view).

Taped April 29 at the Lawrence Joel Coliseum Annex in Winston-Salem, NC by The Carolinian/Wilmington Journal newspapers before his crucial May 6 primary victory against then Democratic rival Sen. Hillary Clinton, Obama, who was accompanied by renowned historian Dr. John Hope Franklin, delved head-on into critical issues such as affordable healthcare; civil rights enforcement and criminal justice; the importance of early childhood education; restructuring the Small Business Administration to help African-American, women-owned and other small enterprises; job opportunities, the mortgage meltdown; rising energy prices and more…Full Article

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Friday Question: Recession or Depression?

Today’s question:  Are we (ie the U.S of A) in a Recession or a Depression? From good ole Wikipedia…

“A recession may involve simultaneous declines in coincident measures of overall economic activity such as employment, investment, and corporate profits. Recessions may be associated with falling prices (deflation), or, alternatively, sharply rising prices (inflation) in a process known as stagflation. A severe or long recession is referred to as an economic depression. Although the distinction between a recession and a depression is not clearly defined, it is often said that a decline in GDP of more than 10% constitutes a depression.[1] A devastating breakdown of an economy (essentially, a severe depression, or hyperinflation, depending on the circumstances) is called economic collapse.”

“In economics, a depression is a term commonly used for a sustained downturn in the economy. It is more severe than a recession (which is seen as a normal downturn in the business cycle). Considered a rare but extreme form of recession, the start of a depression is characterized by unusual increases in unemployment, restriction of credit, shrinking output and investment, price deflation or hyperinflation, numerous bankruptcies, reduced amounts of trade and commerce, as well as violent currency devaluations. Unlike a recession, there is no official definition for a depression, even though some have been proposed. Generally it is marked by a substantial and sustained shortfall of the ability to purchase goods relative to the amount that could be produced given current resources and technology (potential output). One could say that while a recession refers to the economy “falling down,” a depression is a matter of “not being able to get up.””

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Friday Question: Do African Americans care about what is going on in Africa?

In light of the famine, civil war, genocide, food shortages, and civil/political instability on the mother continent I raise this question”

Do African Americans care about what is going on in Africa? If you feel that the answer is yes, please note how we show that we care.

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