Tag Archives: lynching

“Wouldn’t you like to be a Nigger too?”

“I’m a nigger, he’s a nigger, she’s a nigger, we some niggers,
wouldn’t you like to be a nigger too?
They like to strangle niggers, blaming niggers, shooting niggers, hanging niggers,
still you wanna be a nigger too?”

NAS had my attention before, when he was going to name his new CD “Nigger”. That has been scrapped and the CD will be untitled from what I hear, but I’m loving his new CD cover. What I’m REALLY REALLY REALLY loving today is his new song “Be a Nigger too” and the video for it. You can check it out below. I’m so excited about this song. The song in the video is longer than the CD version, but I think they should change that. I know some of you won’t be able to get past the n-word. That’s ok. I know it’s painful. However, as a child of black revolutionaries…I love this s**t. I think it’s conscious and I haven’t heard much consciousness in hip hop music lately. In the video he says,

“They say we N-I Double G E-R, We Are, Much More, But still we choose to ignore the obvious/ We are the Slave And the Master. What you lookin for? You the question and the answer.”

Yes we really are.

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Racism goes beyond lynching [racial slur here]

An article from South African writer Fikile-Ntsikelelo Moya aka the F-Word aka one of my new heroes.

From Mail and GuardianRacism goes beyond lynching niggers
One Sunday afternoon the news editor at my previous paper sent me to cover a dog show at Gilloolies Farm, east of Johannesburg. When I got there the woman behind the ticket counter ignored me and routinely focused on people who came after me.

When she did pay attention to me she asked me: “What are you here to deliver?” In her mind the idea of a black guy enjoying the sight of dogs jumping through hoops was a bridge too far.

The woman and the people she paid attention to were white. I was (and still am) black. I called her action racist and people who commit racist actions, racists.

I might have been wrong. Perhaps the lady at the dog show is a nice woman who has never said an unkind word about people of other hues.

But that is where part of the problem lies.

Somehow we have developed the idea that unless you lynch niggers in a plantation or bang the heads of uppity black detainees against the prison walls until they die you are not really a racist.

Hold on, not even beating up darkies qualifies as racism. As one Pumas rugby team supporter, JR Nagel, told The Times when asked his opinion about the team fielding Gert van Schalkwyk (not to be confused with the Kaizer Chiefs midfielder of the same name) who is on appeal after he and his friends were convicted of beating a black man to death. “We all, even myself … my chommies [friends] and I have beaten up a couple of kaffirs. You are young, that’s what you do. In those days your dad told you that’s kwaai [cool].

“The only reason this is an issue is because it’s a kaffir who died and it was a white laaitie [boy] who hit him,” Nagel said.

Granted, the last statement reflects the unique idiocy of the speaker rather than a general trend of thought. Still, the unfortunate reality is that there is simply too little respect by our white compatriots for black people’s sensitivities to colonialism and racism. Or they are just too shy to show it. Continue reading

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Ferraro learns a lesson, lynching cartoon

ferraro lynching cartoon
Geraldine Ferraro has stepped down from her honorary post in the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign and the Clintons have apologized for her comments. Tsk Tsk. This cartoon takes her “He happens to be very lucky to be who he is.” comment to a new level. To me it says “When has it ever been a thing of luck to be a Black man in the US??“. With all that Black men have faced…lucky is the word you use?? Oh and of course he just can’t be intellegent or the right man for the job (or “clean” as others have been brow beat for noting).

Simply, Ferraro was using race to kneecap the Black candidate.

Her comment points once again to an attitude in the Clinton camp that has been expressed so many times now it cannot be accidental. In their universe, Obama is an apparition, devoid of substance, elevated well beyond his abilities by the novelty of race. He is, as Ferraro says, “lucky to be who he is.”

And that is Clinton’s big lie. If it is the happy good fortune of mere complexion that can make a candidate formidable, why is Obama the first and only Black man to be a viable contender for the White House?

Before Ferraro, there was the unidentified Clinton adviser who told the London Guardian, “If you have a social need, you’re with Hillary. If you want Obama to be your imaginary hip Black friend and you’re young and you have no social needs, then he’s cool.”

And then came Bill… – Read the rest at The Arizona Republic

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Black History: From “Racism: A History”

The story that James Allan (Without Sanctuary) in the second video about the lynching…that was just horrible.  Dyson on the history of the Minstrels…love it.  Can’t forget the Brits and King Leopold in Africa either.  Much love to the BBC.

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Female Anchor Suspended for Reference to Tiger Woods Being Lynched

Hello, Negro says…Girlfriend, you should have known better.  Black man + “lynch him” = drama.  Have you people learned nothing from Don Imus? 

HONOLULU (AP) — Golf Channel suspended anchor Kelly Tilghman for two weeks on Wednesday for saying last week that young players who wanted to challenge Tiger Woods should “lynch him in a back alley.”

Tilghman was laughing during the exchange Friday with analyst Nick Faldo at the Mercedes-Benz Championship, and Woods’ agent at IMG said he didn’t think there was any ill intent.

But the comments became prevalent on news shows Wednesday, and the Rev. Al Sharpton joined the fray by demanding she be fired immediately. Golf Channel didn’t know who would replace Tilghman in the booth this week at the Sony Open or next week at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic.

“There is simply no place on our network for offensive language like this,” Golf Channel said in a statement.

Tilghman became golf’s first female anchor last year when the PGA Tour signed a 15-year deal in which Golf Channel broadcasts the first three events of the year, weekday coverage of all tour events, and full coverage of the Fall Series and opposite-field events.

The suspension ends in time for the Buick Invitational on Jan. 24, when Woods will make his 2008 debut.

Faldo and Tilghman were discussing young players who could challenge the world’s No. 1 player toward the end of Friday’s broadcast at Kapalua when Faldo suggested that “to take Tiger on, maybe they should just gang up for a while.”

“Lynch him in a back alley,” Tilghman replied.

“While we believe that Kelly’s choice of words was inadvertent and that she did not intend them in an offensive manner, the words were hurtful and grossly inappropriate,” Golf Channel said in its statement. “Consequently, we have decided to suspend Kelly for two weeks, effective immediately.”

Woods and Tilghman have known each other 12 years. She was picked to host a club demonstration with Woods in south Florida when he talked about new products from Nike Golf.

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Simulated Lynching at an Elementary School

Hello Negro says, “Experience is the best teacher.”

Telegraph.co.uk | NYC

A primary school in Louisiana is investigating an incident in which a noose was placed around a kindergarten child’s neck.

The Alma J Brown Elementary School newspaper published pictures of black adults placing the noose around at least one child’s neck at a mock rally on the same day as the mass anti-racism protest at Jena in September.

The children, whose school sits on the campus of a traditionally black university, were reportedly been taught about the issues at Jena, including the symbolism of the nooses that white students hung from a tree in their school’s grounds.

Teachers reportedly produced the replica noose and also allowed the children to carry chains and shackles.

A woman claiming to be a grandmother of one of the children later told the university’s website: “Yes, it was a rope around the little girl’s neck. It was a demonstration as to what the rope symbolised to blacks.”

She added: “I held her in my arms and she knows that I would not harm her or put her life in danger. In order to understand racism one must experience it to make the connection.”

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