Tag Archives: public

Friday Question: Is Obama Addressing Black America’s Issues?

This article brings up a good question for our discussion this friday.

HAS OBAMA ADDRESSED BLACK ISSUES? by CASH MICHAELS
The Wilmington Journal

Beyond the need for the black family to be strengthened, and errant black fathers in struggling inner cities to help rear their children, has Sen. Barack Obama addressed other serious policy issues specific to the African-American community, or has he, as Rev. Jesse Jackson has suggested, engaged only in “talking down to blacks”?

The answer can be found on YouTube (www.youtube.com), the popular Internet video site, where a four-part, “Obama w/Black Press” video of the Democratic presumptive presidential nominee speaking to publishers and reporters with the NC Black Publishers Association (NCBPA) three months ago can be found (go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1NA4T0F-rU to view).

Taped April 29 at the Lawrence Joel Coliseum Annex in Winston-Salem, NC by The Carolinian/Wilmington Journal newspapers before his crucial May 6 primary victory against then Democratic rival Sen. Hillary Clinton, Obama, who was accompanied by renowned historian Dr. John Hope Franklin, delved head-on into critical issues such as affordable healthcare; civil rights enforcement and criminal justice; the importance of early childhood education; restructuring the Small Business Administration to help African-American, women-owned and other small enterprises; job opportunities, the mortgage meltdown; rising energy prices and more…Full Article

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Keep Fighting: Violence at the Katrina Public Housing Protest

katrinaGood ole southern justice I guess, huh?!?!?

Haven’t these people gone through enough America?? Visit ABC NEWS for the story in photos. (Photo: Alex Brandon/AP Photo)

NEW ORLEANS (Associated Press) — After violent clashes with police at City Hall, protesters vowed that the fight over a plan to demolish 218 public housing buildings for the poor was far from over, both in the courts and on the streets.

On Thursday, police used chemical spray and stun guns on protesters who tried to force their way into a City Council meeting where the members voted unanimously to allow the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to demolish 4,500 public housing units.

The vote allows demolition crews to begin tearing down the buildings within weeks unless they are blocked in the courts. Lawyers fighting the demolition say they have not exhausted their legal options.

Endesha Juakali, a protest leader arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace, said the confrontation with the council was not the last breath from protesters.

“For everything they do, we have to make them pay a political consequence,” Juakali said. He vowed that when the bulldozers try to demolish the St. Bernard complex, “it’s going to be an all out effort.”

For weeks, protesters have been gearing up to battle with bulldozers and have discussed a variety of tactics, including lying in front of the machinery.

Thursday’s confrontation was the most violent and tense of a string of protests that have brought attention to the plight of a growing number of homeless and the lack of inexpensive housing for people displaced by Hurricane Katrina.

Developers chosen by HUD to do the $700 million in redevelopment work said they were eager to get started and that the protracted fight over demolitions has stood in the way of building better communities.

Police said 15 people were arrested on charges ranging from battery to disorderly conduct. Four people were taken to hospitals — two of them women who had been stunned with Tasers — and five others were injured and treated on the scene, police said. All four in the hospital were stable, police said.

Protesters said they pushed against the iron gates that kept them out of the building because the Housing Authority of New Orleans had disproportionately allowed supporters of the demolition to pack the council’s chambers. Dozens tried to force their way in.

At the peak of the confusion, some 70 protesters were facing about a dozen mounted police and 40 more law enforcement officers on foot. Continue reading

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Judge Rules, Jena Six Open to the Public

MSNBC.com is reporting…

JENA, La. – Legal proceedings against a black teenager among a group whose prosecution in the beating of a white classmate led to a massive civil rights protest must be open to the public, a judge ruled Wednesday.

Because the charges involve violence, all proceedings against Mychal Bell — including hearings, the trial and sentencing — will be public even though Bell is being tried as a juvenile, state District Judge Thomas Yeager decided.

“We need to have public trials so the public has confidence in what we do,” Yeager said during a hearing in a lawsuit filed by media organizations covering the so-called Jena Six.

The thing that jumped out to me was that the reporter said “so-called Jena Six”.  What else would they be called…six wild niggas from Louisiana?!?!  Seriously, is this trial public so that confidence can be built up, or so that they can pull out some bullshit craziness during the proceedings that will taint the public’s perception of the Jena Six…and cause problem in additional cases?  I don’t know…I’m no lawyer.

I’m like Richard Pryor…”I went to court looking for Justice and that’s what I found…Just Us.”

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