Tag Archives: students

UC San Diego Racial Unrest Continues: Hood Found on Statue

The LA Times is reporting that a “Ku Klux Klan-like hood was fashioned from a pillowcase and placed on a statue outside UC San Diego’s main library, in what may be another racially provocative incident at the beach-side campus, officials said Tuesday.”

Um…when is a klansman’s hood ever not a sign that it’s racially provocative?  Not “may be”.  The word would be “is”.

University police say they are investigating the matter as a possible hate crime and examining the hood for fingerprints and even DNA analysis.

The hood, with a hand-drawn cross inside a circle, was found about 11 p.m. Monday on the statue of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as the children’s book author Dr. Seuss, after whom the library is named. A rose was inserted into the statue’s fingers.

Why Dr. Seuss? I love Dr. Seuss. That’s just wrong!

I really feel for the black students at UC San Diego. Hell, I feel for us all. Especially those of you who have had your Post-Racial hopes shattered in the last year. Oh no, institutionalized racism is alive and well.

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Kudos to Students Who Walked Out of the UC San Diego “Teach-in”

I am proud of students who took action today at UC San Diego.  I know the school had very good intentions, but a “teach-in” on racial tolerance was likely seen as a politically correct band-aid.  Talk is not what these students want.  They want action.  They want to feel that they are in an environment where racists are taken to task when they do bold things, like throwing a neo-blackface party.  A long seminar on racial tolerance is like workplace sexual harassment classes.  Everyone in the room nods and says they understand.  What would you expect them to do, defend their right to grab their secretary’s butt or tell a couple penis jokes?  Keep fighting kids.  Even if you don’t see the results you want, you will not leave that University with regrets.

LA Times: Nine days after an off-campus student party mocked Black History Month, UC San Diego went through a day of protests, tumult and self-examination Wednesday, especially concerning the small number of African American students enrolled at the beachside campus.

University administrators sponsored a teach-in on racial tolerance that attracted a standing-room-only crowd of more than 1,200 students, faculty and staff to an auditorium in the student center. But halfway through what was to be a two-hour session in response to the offensive racial stereotypes at the Feb. 15 “Compton Cookout” party, most students walked out in protest.

They then held their own noisy but peaceful rally outside the building. Administrators may have thought the teach-in “would make us quiet,” said Fnann Keflezighi, vice chairman of the Black Student Union. But she said minority students don’t believe that UC San Diego will take significant steps to make them feel more comfortable on campus and increase their numbers.

The controversial party, she and others contended, was just the spark that ignited new activism about long-simmering issues at the university. Many wore special black and white T-shirts that proclaimed: “Real Pain, Real Action, 1.3%” — a reference to the percentage of African Americans among the campus’ undergraduates, thought to be the lowest in the UC system.

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Sharpton Thinks Black Chicago Kids Should Skip School

He calls the public school system a throwback to Jim Crow days.
Because Chicago Public Schools have done far too little to distance themselves from the separate-and-unequal school system of the Jim Crow Era, parents should keep their children away from classrooms when school convenes on Sept. 2, says the Rev. Al Sharpton, who has joined the growing boycott. “Whether it be funding and whether it be graduation rates, we are still separated and unequal,” Sharpton said, speaking to the congregation at the New Landmark Missionary Baptist Church on Sunday morning. “Well maybe if it wasn’t unfair, they [ministers] wouldn’t be talking about a boycott.” Illinois Gov. Todd Blagojevich says he’s working with lawmakers to bring about educational equity, The Chicago Sun Times reports. “I have called the legislators back into special session on Tuesday to focus specifically on school funding,” he told Channel 2 News. “But I think it’s wrong to encourage kids to miss school.”

Source

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Morehouse’s first white valedictorian

I had to share this article because the guy is from my hometown, Kansas City. He’s a cutie too. One of those Spelman girls needs to try “Something New”. LOL  Oh reverse racism…you’ll see it in the article.  Sad, but…I’m not surprised.  Come on Morehouse Men…let’s try to be a little more open minded!

ATLANTA, Georgia (CNN) — Joshua Packwood knows what it’s like to be a minority. This weekend he’ll be the first white valedictorian to graduate from the historically black, all male Morehouse College in the school’s 141-year history.

Morehouse, in Atlanta, Georgia, is one the nation’s most prestigious universities of its kind. For more than a century, the school has prided itself on personifying the dream of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., one of the school’s most notable alums, by producing “Morehouse Men” – intelligent and successful black leaders.

“Because I’m one of the only white students, it’s easy to call me ‘the white boy,’ I’m naturally going to stand out,” says Packwood.

But Packwood, 22, doesn’t stand out solely because he is white or has maintained a 4.0 grade point average. For those who don’t know him, what is surprising is that a Rhodes Scholar finalist turned down a full scholarship to Columbia University to attend the all-black men’s university.

This came naturally to Packwood, who attended a predominantly black high school.

“A large majority of my friends, like all my girlfriends have been minorities,” says Packwood. “So it was very, it was kind of strange that I always kind of gravitated to the black community.”

Packwood fit in immediately at Morehouse. His charm, movie-star good looks and chiseled physique made him popular among students. He was elected dorm president and to class council during freshmen year – and was a favorite at campus fashion shows.

Life hasn’t always been easy for Packwood. He grew up in a poor area of Kansas City, Missouri, where he says he found himself gravitating to the black community at a young age. Continue reading

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The Debate over Afrocentric Schools in Canada

‘‘Black school is segregation. Martin Luther King and how many of our fathers fought to come together, so blacks and whites could be together. Sitting at the front of the bus together. This is 2008. Please. What we’re doing is segregating each other. – Loreen Small, Jordan Manners’ mother, to the Toronto District School Board on Tuesday night.

Living in America I can’t say I agree with that. I feel that Afrocentric, all black schools can help some students, especially those students who come from communities where they only encounter blacks and other minorities in 70% of their day to day life. For example, I’ve lived in communities on the east coast where I could go all day (especially on a weekend) and see less than 2 white people all day. Many children need are not socialized by the black community with regard to functioning in integrated environments. They need a strong sense of identity and to be taught there history, so that they won’t become victims of assimilation. Many times black children only identify with current black culture, because that’s all they are taught. If these children can learn of their whole selves, their whole history, they can then be socialized to deal with the greater, diverse culture. They will understand that they have a rich, important history. They will understand their unique and beautiful place in the world. From that perspective, many children will be able to better integrate when they move on from an Afrocentric school, in my opinion. However, having said this…I know that just because a student attends an Afrocentric school doesn’t mean they will gain the type of perspective I’m talking about. That really takes a holistic approach…family, community, schools, spiritual life, etc. I certainly would not assume that a “black only” school would be an “answer” for Black Canadian children, especially if the black community and experts are not in control of it’s creation. Continue reading

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The Sallie Mae Fund and BET Networks partner to Send African Americans to College

$25,000 Scholarship Competition and Free Scholarship Directory Help Students Identify and Access Money for College

RESTON, Va., Dec. 4 /PRNewswire/ — The Sallie Mae Fund and BET Networks are collaborating on two new initiatives to generate awareness of scholarships and other college-funding resources among African-American students.

“On average, college graduates earn $1 million more than high school graduates in the course of a lifetime,” said Debra Lee, chairman and CEO of BET Networks. “Increased awareness is the key to helping more African Americans realize their dream of going to college and, in turn, access that greater earning power.”

Today, BET will launch a special program to promote college scholarship awareness among its 87 million viewers and Web users. The “Next Level” scholarship competition will award $25,000 in Sallie Mae Fund scholarships to deserving students. Applications for the awards will be accepted on BET’s Web site from now through December 21. Winners will be announced in February. For more information about the “Next Level” scholarship competition, visit www.BET.com/nextlevelscholar.

In addition, a new directory will provide African-American students and their families with easier access to hundreds of college scholarships and millions in scholarship dollars. Sponsored by The Sallie Mae Fund and BET and produced by the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education, “Black College Dollars,” available at www.blackcollegedollars.org, offers a free, comprehensive listing of more than 300 scholarships designed for African-American students.

Source: CNNMoney.com 

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Tom Joyner on Black Men and College

More black men must go to college
The problem of black male enrollment in college starts with the lack of black males in high school and junior high.


Every year, I visit more than a dozen black college campuses giving graduation speeches and helping them raise money. It makes me feel good to see all those students’ smiling faces, but there’s something missing. As much as I like to see all the African-American women graduating from historically black colleges and universities and enjoy getting all those hugs, I’d like to get more firm handshakes from young brothers in caps and gowns. In other words, I’m not seeing enough black males’ faces at these graduations, and that’s got me worried.

In fact, I’m so worried, my foundation started a scholarship fund – “Brothers on the Move” — to make sure more black men stay in school — and graduate. Already, I’ve given $2,500 scholarships to young black men at Tougaloo College, Cheney University of Pennsylvania and Tennessee State University. Before the end of the year, young men at Edward Waters College and Savannah State University will be recognized. I had to do something to at least level the playing field for these brothers and make sure they have every chance they can to get a college degree. The reality is that the statistics tell the story…click here for the rest of this article from the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

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